Qt Downloads moving to qt.io

Published Wednesday November 26th, 2014 | by

QtProject_02-Download_Page_768x400As you have noticed from the banner on the qt-project.org download page, downloads are moving to qt.io. This is part of unifying Qt and defragmenting the community. The intention is to gradually move to using one Qt website for all services.

Downloads have been available on the unified Qt site for some time now, and everything has been working well there, so today we will start forwarding all traffic that is coming to qt-project.org/downloads to the qt.io/download page.

On the unified Qt download page you’ll find all the downloads as before plus the commercial options on one page.

Next steps

Next in the site unification is the moving of the Qt blog and documentation to the new site and making a unified login service for all the Qt online services.

The Qt blog will be moving to the qt.io domain with a new layout in the coming weeks. This change will be straightforward and isn’t expected to cause any issues.

We received good feedback from you on the new look and feel of the documentation. Thank you. We made changes based on the feedback, and now the Qt 5.4.0 release documentation will be available on doc.qt.io. You can already see the release candidate documentation at doc.qt.io. The rest of the documentation will also be moving to the new address later on.

The new unified login, Qt Account, will enable you to use the same credentials for forums, wiki, bugs and all the other services. We will start moving services that need a login to qt.io as soon as the new login system is properly tested and available for use. The current plan is that in early 2015 we should have most of the developer services in the unified Qt site.

If you have feedback or questions, please leave a comment!

1 Comment


Posted in Community, Qt.io, Website

Qt Weekly #20: Completing the offering: QOpenGLWindow and QRasterWindow

Published Thursday November 20th, 2014 | by

Together with the introduction of QOpenGLWidget, Qt 5.4 adds two more classes: QOpenGLWindow and QRasterWindow. Let us now look at the list of native window classes and OpenGL container widgets. The list may look long and confusing at first glance, but it is all quite logical so everything will fall into place quickly:

  • QWindow: Represents a native window in the windowing system. The fundamental window class in Qt 5. Every top-level window, be it widget or Quick based, will have a QWindow under the hood. Can also be used directly, without widgets or Quick, both for OpenGL and software rendered graphics. Has no dependencies to the traditional QWidget stack.
  • QRasterWindow: Convenience wrapper over QWindow for software rendered graphics.
  • QOpenGLWindow: Convenience wrapper over QWindow for OpenGL graphics. Optionally backed by a framebuffer object, but the default behavior (and thus performance) is equivalent to QWindow.
  • QOpenGLWidget: The modern replacement for Qt 4’s QGLWidget. A widget for showing OpenGL rendered content. Can be used like any other QWidget. Backed by a framebuffer object.
  • QQuickWindow: A QWindow subclass for displaying a Qt Quick 2 (QML) scene.
  • QQuickView: Convenience wrapper for QQuickWindow for easy setup of scenes loaded from QML files.
  • QQuickWidget: The equivalent of QQuickView in the QWidget world. Like QOpenGLWidget, it allows embedding a Qt Quick 2 scene into a traditional widget-based user interface. Backed by a framebuffer object.

For completeness sake, it is worth noting two additional APIs:

  • QQuickRenderControl: Allows rendering Qt Quick 2 scenes into framebuffer objects, instead of targeting an on-screen QQuickWindow.
  • QWidget::createWindowContainer(): In Qt 5.1 & 5.2 the only way to embed Qt Quick 2 content (or in fact any QWindow) into a widget-based UI was via this function. With the introduction of QQuickWidget and QOpenGLWidget this approach should be avoided as much as possible. Its usage should be restricted to cases where it is absolutely neccessary to have a real native window embedded into the widget-based interface and the framebuffer object-based, more robust alternatives are not acceptable, or where it is known in advance that the user interface layout is such that the embedded window will not cause issues (for example because the embedded window does not care about input, is not part of complex layouts that often get resized, etc.).

We will now take a look at no. 2 & 3, the QWindow convenience wrappers.

Read more …

13 Comments


Posted in Graphics, OpenGL, QPA, Qt

Tasuku Suzuki is the second Qt Champion

Published Tuesday November 11th, 2014 | by

QtChampion_logo_72dpi_RGB_color

Last week in the Americas Qt Developer Days, our second Qt Champion was announced.

Tasuku Suzuki, who has been working hard with the Japanese Qt community has earned the Qt Champion title.

Suzuki-san got his first introduction to Qt when as a student back in 2002 he needed to make a UI for a scientific simulator he had written as part of his studies. He tried out several different toolkits and found Qt best suited for his needs.

After that Suzuki-san got more involved in Qt, when  he joined Trolltech in 2006, as a local technical sales support person for Japan. Suzuki-san and his colleagues did a lot of work to get Qt more known locally in Japan. They at some point translated the whole Qt website to Japanese, to make it more accessible. He was also heavily involved in making the Japanese Qt Developer Conferences happen in 2009 – 2011.

Qt_Dev_Tokyo_2011

More recently Suzuki-san has been heavily involved in the Qt Meetups in Japan. The meetups originate from 2010, when @vivisuke started having Qt meetups in his home city. The meetup activity spread inside Japan and soon there were quite a lot of separate meetups in different cities. In 2012 these meetups joined to form the Japan Qt Users’ Group. Around this time Suzuki-san was already active in the Tokyo meetup and the community agreed that he could take over organising the Tokyo meetups.

The format of the meetups in Japan varies, but Suzuki-san has changed the format from a presentation style event to a more active coding event. Everyone can come to the meetup and code, study and ask questions on Qt. These meetups have been happening continuously every month since January 2013, and have attracted new developers to Qt too.

One of the fun details in the meetups is the Qt Sweets Division with @hermit4, whose mission is to provide snacks for the meetups. The results are pretty impressive (cake, choclate and cake 2).

As part of the meetups, Japanese developers have contributed code and bug reports to the Qt project. Suzuki-san has also helped in this, as the language barrier is a problem for many Japanese developers.

Suzuki-san codes himself too, he has worked on different things, including Japanese text input for Qt based platforms.

Another interesting project Suzuki-san is working on, is silk- Simple and flexible web framework. Silk is a Qt project that makes it possible to write server-side code with QML and JavaScript. It comes with everything needed to get running fast with Qt on the server.

Suzuki-san has also contributed code to Qt for several years, and has several contributions to his name.

A package of goodies is on it’s way to Japan, and a one year Qt Professional license has been given to Suzuki-san. I would like to congratulate Suzuki-san on his new title as Qt Champion!

Comments Off


Posted in Uncategorized

Documentation now up for testing in doc.qt.io

Published Friday November 7th, 2014 | by

Hello,

We have been working on transferring Qt documentation under qt.io and would like to have your feedback on the work so far. All improvement suggestions are welcome. We have a meta-bug opened on the Qt bugtracker where you can add your findings.

The new documentation can be found at http://doc.qt.io/

So what has changed?

–          New layout and style to match qt.io style
–          New documentation publishing process (this is mostly for the benefit of the documentation team)
–          All documentation will be (eventually) transferred under the same location

The upcoming Qt 5.4.0 release will see the Qt 5.4.0 documentation only on the qt.io site, along with downloads.

The other parts of the documentation will also move to the new site in due time. However with that we need to make sure that we have working redirects in place. The web is full of links to the documentation and we want to make sure people don’t end up on a 404 page. So we are not hurrying the move, the redirects need to go right on the first try.

But now we are looking forward to your comments on the new look and feel of the documentation!

17 Comments


Posted in Announcements, Documentation, Qt.io, Website


Qt Creator 3.3 beta released

Published Thursday October 30th, 2014 | by

We are happy to announce that we released Qt Creator 3.3 beta1 today.

editordraganddrop

It comes with enhanced support for splitting editors and additional editor windows. You can now drag & drop editors between splits by dragging the new file type icon, next to the document drop down (see screenshot). Hold the Ctrl key (or Option key on OS X) to open another editor on the same document, instead of moving it. The navigation views (such as Projects and Open Documents) also support dragging files onto splits. Dropping files from the system onto a Qt Creator window now will also open the file in the appropriate split.

Read more …

22 Comments


Posted in Qt, QtCreator, Releases

An update on OS X Code Signing

Published Wednesday October 29th, 2014 | by

There has recently been updates to the OS X code signing process. These updates also affect Qt applications signed for distribution, both on and outside the App Store.

OS X 10.9 Mavericks introduced version 2 signatures. As of OS X 10.9.5 and 10.10 Yosemite, v2 signatures are now required. We’ve recently spent some time updating Qt to be v2 compliant and Qt 5.4 will be the first compliant release. This includes patches to qmake and the macdeployqt deployment utility. Manually correcting the signing errors is possible if you are using an older version of Qt.

The Apple documentation is quite comprehensive on this topic, in particular see Code Signing Guide and TN2206 OS X Code Signing In Depth. The Qt tracking bug for this issue is QTBUG-32896.
Read more …

9 Comments


Posted in Mac OS X

Say hello to the first Qt Champion!

Published Monday October 20th, 2014 | by

QtChampion_logo_72dpi_RGB_colorLast week our first Qt Champion was awarded his title in Berlin at the Qt Developer Days Europe. Samuel Gaist (SGaist on the forums) is now a Community Builder Qt Champion.

If you have visited the Qt Forums you probably have seen Samuels answer to some question. He is, and has long been, the most active contributor on the Forums, topping the most active contributors list week after week.

Aside from Samuels sheer amount of activity on the forums, his other distinguishing feature is his positive attitude to all questions. He sees the positive wibe as a feature of the community and wants to keep the positive energy flowing by contributing himself. in Qt people are willing to help each other with questions and problems, so it is one form of giving back.

Samuel had heard of Qt as he had used Linux and the KDE desktop about ten years ago, but he learned about Qt properly during his studies at the “HES-SO Valais Wallis” school. At the start of 2012 Samuel joined the Qt project forums and hasn’t looked back since.

The biggest Qt project Samuel has up-to-date worked on has been the AgiScan film scanning software, which he worked on at Edeltech Ltd. He also did a talk at the Qt Developer Days Europe 2014 about his experiences on the project.

SgaistIn the last year or so Samuel has also started contributing code to Qt. It all sterted with a question on the forums about a bug in QFileDialog on Mac OS X. Samuel figured he could actually fix the bug and went ahead and answered the question and fixed the bug. From then on Samuel has taken to occasionally looking at the Qt bug reporting system and finding places where he can help, like bug fixing, documentation updates and code cleanups. Lately Samuel has also done some feature work with help from other contributors.

Samuel has found that the diverse background of people involved in the Qt project makes for good discussions, be it on the forums, contribution reviews or the mailing lists. Talking and getting feedback makes for better contrbutions.

In addition to the nice cap and t-shirt, Samuel will be receiving a Qt Professional license for the next year.

Please join me in congratulating our first Qt Champion, Samuel Gaist!

5 Comments


Posted in Uncategorized

Qt 5.4 Beta Available

Published Friday October 17th, 2014 | by

I am extremely happy to announce that Qt 5.4 Beta is now available for download. There are a lot of new and interesting things in Qt 5.4 and I will try to summarize the most important highlights in this blog post.

Powerful Web Offering with Qt WebEngine

As the importance of HTML5 has grown we want to provide the best support for HTML5 within the Qt technology offering. The Qt WebEngine, a long-term R&D project based on the Chromium web engine has now reached fully supported version on desktop and embedded platforms.

Qt WebEngine provides a convenient API for both Qt Widgets and Qt Quick for using the Chromium web engine. Besides plain web viewing purposes Qt WebEngine takes full benefit of the whole Qt graphics stack integration allowing you to mix and overlay native Qt controls with web contents and OpenGL shaders. Of course, the fact that Qt provides a full application framework around the web engine makes Qt WebEngine truly an unparalled web engine API.

The new Qt WebChannel module acts as the bridge between QML/C++ and HTML/JavaScript allowing you to expose QObjects into the web context.

For platforms that do not allow distribution of Qt WebEngine as well as use cases where a full-blown web engine is not needed Qt 5.4 will introduce a technology preview of a new module called Qt WebView. It supports embedding the native web engines of the underlying operating system into Qt, and is currently available for Android and iOS. Because of this, Qt WebView also gives a convenient light-weight solution for simple web document integration. Qt WebView will be available with Qt 5.4 final as a separate add-on.

Read more …

72 Comments


Posted in Licensing, Qt, Releases

Update on the qt.io website work

Published Thursday October 16th, 2014 | by

Hello, some news from the new qt.io website work we are doing.

First, thank you to everyone who provided feedback on the new qt.io site, we appreciate all the comments we have gotten on different channels. And while every comment will not make it as a change to the site, we do evaluate every single one of them and see if something needs to be tweaked.

Please don’t expect instant changes, we have a pretty long backlog including big items like: “How do we solve the problem of using a unified Qt account for logging into all the services we provide on the web?” A bit of patience on your part is appreciated.

That said, the documentation pages are next on the list of things moving to qt.io. One target of moving the documentation is to bring all the open source and commercial documentation under one landing page. That means that you will find all relevant documentation from one location, no more jumping between two sites.

During the documentation move, we will be retiring the docnotes feature on qt-project.org. While there have been some very high quality notes from the community, the feature has mostly gone unused. The effort to maintain the docnotes feature is not worth the benefit that it brings.

One thing we have on the list of things that could be simplified, is contributing to documentation. The issue with contributing to the documentation is that the documentation is built from the Qt source itself, thus any changes to the documentation need to go through the same process as code contributions. And the contribution process might seem a bit complicated to people who are not familiar with it. We haven’t figured out how to best do this, so it’s still in the backlog. If you have ideas on how we could make contributing to the docs easier we would appreciate if you shared them with us.

The schedule for the documentation page moves to their new home on qt.io is before the Qt 5.4.0 release.

We will also be moving all downloads to qt.io with the same schedule as the documentation. The upcoming Qt 5.4 beta will be available on both the qt.io and qt-project.org sites, but now that the qt.io download page has been updated based on the feedback we got (thank you!) we hope that you already move over there for the downloads.

The wiki will be moving over to qt.io after the documentation and downloads as well. The new wiki will be a MediaWiki instance. With the wiki, the biggest amount of work is not setting up the new wiki, but rather moving the content over to the new wiki. We have a lot of external links coming into the wiki, and we need to have pointers to the new wiki from the current one. A rough estimate is that we need to move between three and five hundred pages to get decent coverage in the new wiki. To do this we will be asking for your help in copying content over and marking pages as moved. But more on that in another post later when we have the new wiki up and running.

As for the forums, those are on the list after the wiki. No fixed schedule for that yet, as we need to figure out how to move the almost 50 000 discussion threads we have on the forums.

We’ll be making more posts on how the site move is going as work progresses here.

6 Comments


Posted in Community, Documentation, migrate, Website | Tags: , ,

  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. ...
  10. 162